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that position in my opinion is not putting country first. i don't care whether they are republican, a democrat, or anything else. we are not each of us going to get everything we want. lord knows. there's a lot i could do if i had a wand and could make it happen. but everybody has a different view of exactly how to go forward and i think we're being tested here. so i know it's tough going, and i know if we don't get a deal, it doesn't stop there, we'll keep on working. but there is no reason on this beautiful god's green earth why we can't get a deal here. if everyone is sincere in saying they want the middle class could be protected, we can get a deal here. president obama says $250,000 is the line, maybe i think $350,000 is the line, maybe someone else $500,000, maybe somebody else $150,000. we can meet somewhere and cut that reason somewhere in the middle. and save this country from the uncertainty, the uncertainty that plagues us right now. in the olden days -- and i say olden, a long time ago -- i was a stock stockbroker. i was an economics major and a stockbroker on wall street. the thin
really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. >>> i'm jim cramer, welcome to my world. >> you need to get in the game. >> going out of business and they're nuts, they know nothing. >> i always like to say there is a bull market somewhere. >> "mad money," you can't afford to miss it. >> i'm cramer. welcome to "mad money." people want to make friends, i'm trying to save you money. call me tonight. tonight i'm letting you in on something big. the method to my madness. i know this show is the craziest, most random, bizarre thing on television, and i also know that you won't find investing advice this good anywhere else. if you're suning in just to see if tonight is the night the show goes off the rails, which it is always a possibility on any given night. sorr
raise taxes above $250,000, and talk about spending cuts later. i don't see how that will ever get through the house. isn't that where we started? >> at this point, who is going to vote for that? once you as a republican vote for that, how do you have leverage later on ever in the negotiations? >> i think that sets up if they get the basic plan through the senate on democratic votes only and send that plan to the house, what that sets up is a failure of the plan in the house, because that's not something republicans said they could support in the past. what that would do you do is set up a situation where democrats are daring republicans on the last day of the deadline to vote against a solution. that could be tricky for them. a lot of republicans say we are not going to give in on the issue of raising taxes without the equivalent spending cuts on the other side of the deal. >> to not bring one face-saving -- one face-saving bone when it comes to spending cuts, i don't see how you get there. >> presumably, they are trying to hammer out that detail along with others in the potential
will have a strong economy if we continue to punish people who produce and somehow reward people who don't. and we have also had a foreign policy that is supposed to make a stronger and more respected, but it hasn't worked out either. let's just put it this way. if that is flexibility, we all better learn to be very flexible the next four years. earlier this month susan rice withdrew her name from consideration from post of secretary of state. that's after strong opposition to her potential nomination. republicans were critical of her after she went on five different sunday news shows. she gave this explanation for the terrorist attacks that killed four americans in benghazi, libya on september 11th. >> the best assessment we have is that in fact this was not a pre planned, premeditated attack. what happened initially was a spontaneous reaction to what had just transpired in cairo. it was a consequence of the video that people gathered outside the embassy, and then it grew very violent. those with extremist ties joined the fray and came with heavy weapons which unfortunately are quite co
and please don't ever dig in your heels when the facts change. two important dispolitics that i stress in my book "getting back to even." it's a book at methodology not just individual stocks working at the time. when you're looking for stocks to investment, hunting for the next bull market, between 6:00 and 11:00 p.m., eastern of course, you have to start somewhere. looking at the new high list, that's a terrific place to begin. it's a terrific already sorted through list. i don't just pluck names off the new high list because i think they have been going up, they'll keep going up. why don't i recommend them on the show? lazy, irresponsible chasing of momentum. i'm a lot of things, lazy and irresponsibility i'm not. i apply the same things to this show as i did at my hedge fund. what i like to do when i'm hunting for stocks, and what you should do, is wait for something to pull back from the new high list. that's a discount from something that's full priced and good. that's when you would pass at a retail store, that's when you pounce in my store. the pullback gives you a good lower priced
handle a lot of the heavy lifting today, please, after about a -- >> you look good, joe. you don't look worse for the wear. how late did it go? >> i think we were -- like after 12:00. 12:30. >> you were tweeting me after 12:00. >> why was he up? oh, i know why you were at. >> i assume you continued the tailgating after that, then. >> no. but i definitely got behind some of the other -- i mean, i was not quite up to snuff with some of the other fans as we were exiting. >> those guys had been at it a little longer than you have? >> jae. you definitely don't want to say, hey, watch it, buddy. >> go redskins, right, and get out of the way? >> right. >> it's more dangerous to go to a game in philly. >> is it, really? >> yeah. they throw batteries and -- >> becky, i'm sorry about rutgers again. we didn't get to talk about that. three straight disappointments. there's always next year. are you ready for the big -- >> ready for notre dame. we have notre dame coming up, too. something else to look forward to. do you guys see any lawmakers? are you for notre dame over the tide? >> yeah. sorry, be
may be worth it in the end. >> as long as you wrap it and don't give it in the plastic bag you got it from shopping in. >> no promises on that front. >>> later this half hour, make or break time for your favorite nfl teams. you know rob is watching all the games. we'll see how the season is shaping up. >> willis, how did the giants do yesterday? how did that game turn out? okay. i'm just curious. i don't hear anything today, willis. >> right, right. >> you're just so quiet. so unlike you today. looking angry. >> it's okay, willis, i'm with you. >> always next season, willis. >>> first, a major cleanup in northern california after a weekend blast of wet weather. dozens of flights were cap seld at bay area airports. >> and the area's famous vineyards under water. >> reporter: it's the christmas trip turned travel nightmare for drivers on the east and west coast. in northern california, with nor snow expected to blanket the sierra mountains, cars are having trouble just staying on the road. >> the roads were pretty bad. there's definitely going to be chain control for the next two day
washington after whom we became a country. what are the lessons of history. i don't study it because it's an interesting habit. i study to better understand the present and future engage in making history by intelligent and informed citizens. what are some of the lessons? let me start with the fiscal cliff. sky an obviously question. how many of you heard the term fiscal cliff? [laughter] i want to say something in washington which will be seen as her receipt call and gingrich going off and making no sense. the contract of america, the balanced budget, welfare reform. i participated my career, reagan's economics defeat of the society yef empire. i'm proud of the number of things i participated in that made no sense in washington. by thomas wolf. this goes book i think to the '60s when he first wrote it. now wolf is try, to describe a particular pattern in san francisco. in which the welfare department figured out that all of the senior welfare people should be on the second floor of the welfare office hiding from people that they serve. and the newest, least paid people should be on the
's ran paul country. he is very mindful of that. i don't think he is in a position right now to cut any kind of deal that would invite a problem for himself at home. >> all right. when we hear senator john barosso saying he thinks the president is eager to go over the cliff because it's going to get some some type of political victory, does anybody inside the white house really feel that way that this is, in general, a political victory for the president or democrats in general? >> i do think that people in the white house -- the president's advisors and even the president think they have the upper hand, thomas. polls show that generally speaking, if we do go over the cliff most folks will sort of blame republicans. i think the white house is using that as their lerchlg. i think also, though, when you hear the politicians are saying that the president iseering to go over the cliff, some of that is posturing to maybe put some of the blame back on him. this is something that if the economy starts to suffer on this, people are going to look to blaming each other. i think that it's likely,
are talking about slavery. we are talking about racial disparities. you know, even the academics don't really believe in these compelling interests from an original point of view. that is not really their focus. so why we have these racial disparities? you know? isn't at all because of slavery? well, last year the federal government cannot let it be known. but they came out with the most recent figures great 72.5% of african americans now are born out of wedlock. 72.3%. american indians, 66.2%. latinos, 53.3%. white people, still pretty high, 29.1%. for asian people, it is 17.2%. so in other words, seven out of 10, six out of 10, five out of 10 for blacks and american indians and latinos because they are the so-called underrepresented in minority who get racial preferences. and a two out of 10 people are typically have racial problems. not only in terms of education but in terms of crime and whatever social indicators that you want. now, that is the real problem. of course, that is not going to be fixed by racial preferences. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, roger. now we will hear from a
, they all had affairs. what do you say to that? >> well, i don't think the idea -- the problem is that general petraeus had an affair. i think the idea and the big problem is that he was director of the cia and he walked into right into one of the most blackmailable situations you can have. it's good the u.s. found out about it before the russians or chinese. it's not that he's a general messing around, and according to the code of the justice that's not allowed. >> teetering on the edge of the fiscal cliff with just 36 days to go until tax increases kick, in the white house and congress are playing a high stakes game of let's make a deal. >> only in america believes there has to be this what i believe to be really farcical now surely -- the nature of the world is very fast moving, america has huge economic problems, heading for another fiscal cliff, everyone laughing at you from afar, the american public sick and tired of all the games going on and there are you, grover norquist, a very bright guy still resolutely saying a pledge is a pledge is a pledge, it cannot be broken wh
us your own views on liberal conservatives now. i was always a bit more of a populist. i don't think i have ever been what i would call a liberal. somebody might call me a progressive. certainly even within the republican party. outsider, and antiestablishmentarian. >> what did you think of richard nixon when you worked with him? >> i liked him better after i wasn't working with him and he was out of the presidency. he is a very intelligent man, a man with enormous personal problems in terms of relating to people. and i understand much better, which i did not a time when i worked for him, how he was not an effective administrator and how he couldn't keep all those worms in the can, whether you are talking about the administration or especially watergate. >> how did you keep up with him after the years that he was president? >> he read one of my books from the early 1980's that he liked. somehow, we started having correspondence again. i would see him max four times a year. his office was up in new york and then in saddle river, new jersey. so when i would go from washington to our ho
the gop is standing up for the rich what the democrats don't understand is that the hostility towards how much washington end spends that this whole discussion of the last six weeks has been about raising taxes on the wealthy. >> let's say we get a deal and it's short-term spending cuts and people don't have someone to blame because we don't go over the cliff, but the markets don't like it the world economy doesn't like it and ultimately our currency becomes in jeopardy as the currency of the world. >> at this point they will blame the republicans. if you can the american people to choose or dig in what they really want is to end the spending more than raising the tacks. they will accept a tax increase on the wealthiest americans. but an even higher percentage support significant spending cuts. and that's not part of the democratic package, so what i'm saying is that both sides here have a problem with the american people, and it's why congress has an 11% job approval rating. gadhafi had an 17% approval rating, and that's from the people he was killing. >>> how ar
's a stunning remark, the money, the time, the scheduling, the scrutiny, the investment. if you don't really want it, why would you jump and devote two years of your life running for the toughest job on the planet? >> i was at the romney headquarters election night and when they learned he wasn't going to be president of the united states, he looked sad. he looked like somebody that really wanted this and it was not going to be. so just seeing the reaction and everything that went to it. and tag said that ann tried to convince him of this, too. >> you have to wonder, did he really not -- he could have made choices and said i'm not going to do it. but you have to wonder did he not want to do it or is this kind of, you know, post election -- like i didn't want it any way. i'm brushing it off. i don't know how to interpret that, but interesting article in "the globe." >>> in other news today, a veteran idaho lawmaker is apologizing after being arrested for dui in washington. virginia police say republican mike crepo had a blood-alcohol level above the legal limit. >>> former president george h.
be very dangerous for anyone. we don't know where that blood clot is, that could be a very significant issue. in fact, her travel was on hold until the middle of the month. benghazi hearings, she will be many coing back this week. looking forward to work and ready to testify up on capitol hill. so all of that will be on hold obviously until they figure out what's going on. >> keep us posted for certain. we expect the best. back in 1998 she call it a blood clot and called it one of the scariest mediciedical experienc her life. >> if you had one before, you are at higher risk, and if you travel a lot, the blood flow may be compressed, benning your legs like that, and with the concussion, one of the things she was told was to rest. not easy for her to do, i can tell you for a fact. that may be part of the inactivity. >> and we don't know what the cause is. back in 1998, it was deep vain thrombosis. >> dvt, a clot in one of the leg veins, in and of itself, not a problem, but it can break off and go to the lungs, called a pulmonary embolism, she is on blood thinners, and you treat the brain
not going to read this because i don't know where those places are. and generally did not have to go to a map much. i did research the way i have always done it, pretty much of myself. bring it all myself and having it there. basically thinking it out or not thinking out, off by myself. >> which character in the 1775 book, both british and american, was the most interesting to you? >> actually, a lot more interesting. if you think interesting in were thesignificant important impression, george washington was probably people think of him as, enormously impressive in a lot of ways. he was very careful in what he did to crate that image. -- to create that image. he made a number of mistakes. the rest of the time, he was very good. sam adams, i have enormous respect for him. he burned a lot of records that might have told us more about him. but i think he seemed a lot of things brilliantly. i think, for example, he knew what happened at lexington and concord before anyone. sam adams schemed all kinds of things out brilliantly. it would take me a documentary and a series of four books to
. and ask yourselves what are the lessons of history? i don't study history because it's an interesting habit, i study history to better understand the present and the future so that i can be engaged in making history by being an intelligent, informed perp. that's what citizenship ought to be. and so what are some of the lessons? now, let me start with the fiscal cliff. and i'd ask a simple, obvious question. this is a very sophisticated group. how many of you have heard the term "fiscal cliff"? [laughter] okay. now, i want to say something which in washington will be seen at heretical and as gingrich once again going off and doing things that make no sense like the contract with america, balanced budget, i've participateed in my career with reagan's supply-side economics. i'm proud of the number of things i've participated in that made no sense in washington. [laughter] there is no fiscal cliff. this is absolute, total nonsenses. the best way to understand what happens to all of us is to read a great essay by tom wolfe, thomas wolfe enentitled mar mowing the flak catchers. this goes ba
heavy rains, tornadoes, which we don't hear a lot of this time of year and high winds to several areas of the country and it's already being blamed for ten deaths. >>> regrettable, politically motivating, saddening, statements made by u.s. officials about russia's decision to ban americans from adopting russian children. vladimir putin signed the ban into law on friday. lawmakers there cite a history of abuse of russian children adopted by american families. many believe it was a retaliation about a law signed by president obama that poses u.s. travel and financial restrictions on human right s abusers in russia. good morning. you were in the process of adopting a 13-year-old boy named -- and his name is daniel from an orphanage in siberia. >> yes. >> tell me the status. is that on hold right now? >> it's definitely on hold because of the law that putin just signed in. but i'm ever hopeful that things are going to change. and i'm hopeful that better communication between both countries might cause putin to rethink the thing he just signed. >> how far along were you in this process to a
, and i didn't, i was in a constituent. i'm not a south carolinians. i don't have anything really to say to him, really. and i also to be honest was a little self-conscious. it was a busy airport. i was kind of self-conscious about standing in line waiting to greet a man who is best known for his old segregationist harangue. so i thought it was good enough to say i had seen him. and keep on walking. i get down, i'm conflicted do. i'm conflicted, and i walked down the concord about 100 yards and i look back and hear everybody is shaking his head, and here's this 89 year-old man at the time, he's got it his briefcase in one hand and a travel bag in the other, and a package under one arm and he's just shuffling down this busy crowded airport. and without thinking i go back and introduce my and introduce most of an asset senator thurmond, my name is joseph crespino, i would be happy to get you to your next life. and he said are you sure you got enough time, i don't want to delay you. i said i got plenty of time. so i picked up his bag. we walked together for about 10 minutes. and i was just
goes in there and then you just go and then it's there. you don't get a check and have to walk it there and sign and chase it down. but that is, i think, increasingly the direction that all work is going. >> chris, this is the most inconvenient truth about the new economy. a third of the workforce is contingent workers. that means they are not working directly for the people who are benefiting for their labor. they are being sourced. they are temporary workers. what this means is they have no one to bargain with. they have to reinvent bargaining. the flip side is that not only is the unemployed have been unemployed for over six months. >> i think there's also -- there's two sides to this, right? because at one level it increases uncertainty tremendously. >> that's true. >> but there's also another level and a class distinction here. for workers that are doing fairly well, like if you're a freelance designer in new york, there's something attractive about this economy in which you are not subject to the structures of unemployment. you can work in your bath robe and you are the m
people think there could be a deal easily, these republicans don't fear the wrath of speaker boehner like they do the whip of norquist. in two weeks' time, we'll have a dramatic tax increase. going over the cliff is the only way these norquist controlled republicans can spare the wrath of grover. which i believe having known grover for 35 years is indeed worth than the wrath of khan. so why bother to sell now? it's a pretty legitimate subsequent, can't it? now we rallied 7% from the november woes. and i believe we can keep selling off. not hard, but certainly a couple percent as more and more people recognize that we could be going over the cliff. even if this is why you shouldn't sell. pull back again. perhaps by getting the achievable goal by helping the middle class with tax breaks. remember, it isn't a cliff where you have a hard landing. more kind of a jump on to a trampoline, maybe like a deep swimming pool. there is a recovery that is almost a certainty, but it could be a vicious belly flop where you come out and you're so red. jim, i think we should look for a grand bargain. inste
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, i don't recall how i made it back across that bridge to the church. but after i got back to the church, the church was full to capacity, more than 2,000 people on the outside trying to get in to protest what had happened on the bridge. and someone asked me to say something to the audience. and i stood up and said something like: "i don't understand it, how president johnson can send troops to vietnam but cannot send troops to selma, alabama, to protect people whose only desire is to register to vote." the next thing i knew, i had been admitted to the local hospital in selma. amy goodman: explain that moment where you decided to move forward, because i don't think the history we learn records those small acts that are actually gargantuan acts of bravery. talk about-i mean, you saw the weapons the police arrayed against you. what propelled you forward, congressmember lewis? rep. john lewis: well, my mother, my father, my grandparents, my uncles and aunts, and people all around me had never registered to vote. i had been working all across the south. the state of mississippi
willis report." don't forget to dvr the show if you cannot catch us live. we will see you back here tomorrow. lou: good evening, everybody. we're bringing you the latest on the obama administration shifting explanations about the benghazi terrorist attacks. among our guests, middle east expert, also the obama administration gearing up to unleash dozens of new job killing regulations in the presidents second term. a live report on one of the agencies issuing many of those rules, environmental protection agency. and the author of the brand-new book, the five cohost joins us tonight. we begin with a political fallout of another tragedy, september 11 murder of fourwe americans in benghazi. susan rice yesterday withdrew her name from consideration too be secretary of state. the move comes after weeks of criticism over comments rice made regarding the attacks in benghazi in an interview with williams, she was asked if she was blameless for the controversy. thi speak i don't think anybody is ever fully blame, but i didn't do anything wrong, did not mislead, did not misrepresent, i did the
, you don't understand. he was want trying to single out for know. he was trying to get for all of the states. i wanted to get an opt out in case the state wanted to opt out. finally the supreme court gave that. but it got used against me while i was drying something that i shouldn't have. and actually i was not. and the interesting thing is i was asked to do this by the nebraska governor, and i did finally get an thank you from another governor from another state. >> that wasn't the so-called kickback. >> that's right. >> during the time you experienced the radio talk show host circuit and the table tv circuit. what was the period like? what do you think that echo chamber in american policy today does for the system? >> the echo chamber is a difficult thing to deal with it. it's not just broadcast, it's the blogs, the tweets, all the electronic communications today. whey found . >> that's been during the twelve years. in 2000 we didn't have . >> that's right. suddenly, you know, and i think i was prepared for what would happen with that i certainly wasn't. as a matter of fact i
degreesed in apnigzs, righteousness disguised in a tuxedo of death much the children don't understand. i being of the dead dying man the bleeding bystanders who left to buy cheese or tobacco. in car bombs suicide bombs and we keep talking as though this will end like the final judgment of that black man who looks white and sleeps with boys but doesn't touch them. after the bleeding the children's shoes will be forever stained in the crimson color of death. who will set the doves free then. >> the next is sdaefrt on the horizon. i'm sure many of you have seen or heard regularly in the news. my father came from iran so every time i see those headlines and get an article in my e mail i have this moment of panic thinking about my family members in iran who might be the next victims of this terrible war administration this is, disaster on the horizon. it begins with words. daggers of men who bleed their nations of hope kill any promise. here is war, a bag full of hate posturing angry man rhetoric unleashing disaster on the horizon. war has no face like a genie it doesn't go back in the bottl
trillion debt and everybody keeps spending. don't we have to pay this debt down? host: the debt is $16.3 tr illion. another looming deadline. the treasury department can extend the deadline for the next month or two. part of the dynamics in the negotiations. front page of "the washington times." is the brink" cutline. host: harry reid had this to say on the senate floor. [video clip] >> the american people do not understand. the house is operating without the house of representatives. it is being operated with a dictatorship by the speaker. if the $250,000 would be brought would pass. speed brainer could've brought legislation to the house and it would have passed. host: gcomments by harry reid. the senate is in session today. bill has this point -- from "the national journal" -- the story is available online. "the president will have a strong hand to play over what to do about the tax hikes and spending cuts about to hit the economy. to allow the bush-era tax cuts to lapse for the wealthiest of americans. good morning, clyde. caller: good morning. political capital. neither harry reid nor
into their beachfront home in pon tevedra. it's known for its golf course and lux homes. >> i don't want to use the term the perfect kidnapping victim, but it fit. >> her husband made a lot of money. >> worst-case scenario is we make one wrong move they kill her. >> on the day she was kidnapped the 37-year-old pta mom had made appointments for her daughters to get haircuts and she was far along in the planning for an upcoming party for one of her daughter's birthdays. now reid gray tried to shield that their mom was in danger. he picked up the girls from school and took them to a friend's house. while he waited at the sheriff's office, reid was still in his shirt and tie from work and he was an emotional wreck. he shared more details about quinn's brief, frantic call to him hours earlier. >> that there was someone with a gun pointed on her head. >> on the call she said they were three kidnappers and they were albanian and the $50,000 ransom was to pay back money reid had borrowed from a loan shark, but reid insisted he didn't owe money to anyone. >> i made $150 million and 50 grand doesn't mean much. >>
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. it will continue its digital format. >> if you haven't finished your holiday shopping, don't worry. millions of americans are expected to hit the store today. >> i have just started. >> i looked at the research footage and looked at your face quite a bit. you don't look a day over than you did 32 years ago. >> wide open with the catch. what a shot. seahawks win it, seattle is in the playoffs. >> and all that matters. >> norad will be tracking santa claus as he makes his way around the world delivering gifts to girls and boys tonight. >> on "cbs this morning." >> from kabul, afghanistan, happy holidays! "cbs this "cbs this morning." >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." i'm jeff glor with rebecca jarvis charlie rose. gayle king and norah o'donnell are off. >>> on the ground and in the air on this busy day before christmas, there's trouble. >> and the problem is a storm system that hit the west coast over the weekend. now it's moving east threatening to cause problems all week long. anna warner is at dallas/ft. worth airport. anna, good morning. >> reporter: we're seeing a stea
steep price. >> i don't believe that fracking will ever be safe. >> reporter: later on sunday morning, the promise and the perils of fracking. >> osgood: jamie foxx has to be one of the most talented people in american show business. you name it. he does it. byron pitts will get him to show you. >> jamie foxx has made it all the way from the little town of texas to the pinnacle of hollywood. ♪ she knows how to... >> my book will be called "i still pinch myself." >> reporter: he's funny. he can sing. he's an oscar winner. you'll see him later. ♪ ahead on sunday morning >> osgood: as the year 2012 comes to a close this morning, we continue our holiday tradition here at sunday morning. we take time out to remember some of the remarkable people who have left us in the year just pending. >> 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,. ♪ take a load off... >> osgood: they made our hearts sing. they made our spirits soar. >> that's one small step for man. >> osgood: some saved lives, some gave their lives. and all touched our lives in ways great and small. we remember those who left us in 2012. on t
don't think any political figure would want to make that sort of decision to have him go home and live the rest of his days out on bed rest, but i just want to throw out there that his father is rumored to have lived over 100. and mubarak is still in his mid-80s. so this is a man who has longevity in his family. >> all right. ian lee, thank you very much. appreciate it. >>> president obama back in washington today to tackle the so-called fiscal cliff. he landed about 30 minutes ago. you see him getting off of the air force one. the president shut his vacation short do deal with this economic crisis. according to a tweet from a white house spokesman, the president spoke with all four congressional leaders before leaving hawaii for washington, and the senate is reconvening today. now the automatic spending cuts and the tax increases that make up the fiscal cliff, they're set to take effect in just five days. much more on the fiscal cliff crisis, the effort to reach some kind of agreement later this hour. we're going go live to capitol hill for the latest as the senate returns to work. th
be an increase. also some agreement -- we don't have the details yet on the inheritance tax or the estate tax. also steps to protect middle class taxpayers from what's known as the alternative minimum tax. interesting part of this whole tax discussion is we are told that the tax decisions made would be permanent so that there wouldn't be one of these deadlines that would create another one of these crisises. that's an issue that we don't often see when lawmakers decide on taxes. there's usually an end point, so they have a chance to go at it again. we're told that permanent is the word of the day. we're also told anything could change as they get closer. lots of constructive conversation, i'm told. the vice president's involvement has been described as being very helpful because he understands how lawmakers think and has good relationships here. that's the latest as we know it. republicans plan to meet with their conference today if there's something to talk about. the president's plan to speak at 1:30 has taken some people very close to this by surprise. chris. >> kelly, i just very quickly
calling into the show lately, they all keep trying to fault one person for the people since. i don't believe in abortion but i am pro-choice because it is not my choice to condemn anybody for doing a sin to themselves. god will judge them. i should never put my beliefs on somebody else and then judge of them. host: you said that religion is affecting your political decisions less lately and you said what their reelection of president obama. can you explain that a little bit more? caller: say it again? host: you said earlier religion is impacting your political decisions less this time around. why is that? caller: not less -- i said now that what is happening is people are judging our presidents on the laws and things he may or may not agree with -- he may not, i do not know which way. politicians should never make laws for his own religious beliefs. host: florence, ky. democratic caller. caller: the other day they had represented the brown on and a tape of him as saying the world is only 9000 years old going off the literal translation. people like that generally lack the ability t
don't -- i think they-- it will be hard to go entirely to the middle because i think the electorate, the ones who did not vote for barack obama voted against this vision and voted against it very strongly and i think the republicans would put that at risk if they went too far to the middle. >> okay. when we come back, states have changed from kansas to michigan, to rhode island, reform is in the air. find out how some states are bucking the washington trend next. thanks to our explorer card. then, the united club. my motr was so wrong about you. next, we get priory boarding on our flight i booked with miles. all because of the card. and me. okay, what's the plan? plan? mm-hmm. we're on vacation. there is no plan. really? [ male announcer ] the united mileageplus explorer card. the mileage card with speci perks on united. get it and you're in. when the doctor told me that i could smoke for the first week... i'm like...yeah, ok... little did i know that one week later i wasn't smoking. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the
>> we don't always find newspaper editors and area embracing reporting. it's not just economics. is the discomfort that investigative reporting often causes in the newsroom. because it's troublesome. it's that more than the economics. if you're going to ruffle the feathers of somebody powerful that gives those people running into complaint to the publisher and destroys their legion over those and we are fortunate to go through the 70's and really almost all of our careers to work for people who are really strong enough right in that area, and let the chips fall where they may. >> akhil reed amar presents his thoughts on the interpretation of the u.s. constitution and what the author means by up to his passages. mr. amar posits the constitution can be understood by the original text alone or historical precedent. akhil reed amar discusses his book with supreme court justice clarence thomas of the national air cried -- archives here in washington. this is about 20 minutes. >> good evening. i'm the archivist of the united states and is a pleasure to welcome you to the national arch
and at that moment as you look back and then we will work our way forward in time. >> i don't have a lot of company in my views on mcintyre and anonymous speech but if you think about it, 225 years ago, you had the articles of confederation. you had a congress that did not work. it was not functioning. oh. [laughter] [applause] that was inadvertent. but you had ,-com,-com ma it was very interesting convention that arguably wasn't quite what they were authorized to do. you have the resolution that is going to be on exhibit that is interestingly worded. someone throws the word unanimous in it and it's used in an interesting way. but you know, think of going to washington and trying to get mount vernon and he doesn't want to leave because he's been away for over four years and he doesn't want to leave. he goes to philadelphia and they do it. they come up with this document, four months, and now you have it, going to the congress to the people. >> to the people. >> to the people to ratify. you know when i read about it, i am one of those. i get chills because that is the beginning of the development of
account. given money away like in new york and new jersey. $60 billion or $80 billion. don't they have insurance of the up there? host: thank you for the call. is this from bill king. this is bob, good morning. caller: happy new year. host: to you, too. caller: all the republican party has to do is to allow for what the voters voted on by putting obama back in office, which was the mandate that people earning above $250,000 pay 4.5%.eer lousy that is not a hair off their chinny-chin-chin. everybody is looking to fight against the tax increase for the wealthiest people. they take a ski vacation in france and a cost $20,000. they spend money like it is garbage. cheerleading for tax breaks for people who do not need it. they have admitted they do not need it. the republicans and the democrats are not facing the key issue with our budget, which is medical cost. it is insanity we do not hear enough and i wish c-span would have more programs dealing with all of the options that could lessen the burden on the government and the taxpayer for the medical costs. i believe that in medicare buy- i
that he had a year ago, that does not count. for republicans and people to say they don't understand what's going on, i have a problem with that. the republicans deny anything he puts forward. the president left his vacation and came here. they're not being fair. republicans say they are christians. they're not. they did this during his last term and now are causing and all of us to suffer because they don't like the president. this is personal. this has nothing to do with raising taxes. this is a personal attack and i think it's a shame. we look like a third world country. we don't look like the united states. host: let's get a republican voice. our next caller is calling from west bloomfield, michigan, on the republican line. good morning. caller: i would like to get your thoughts on a balanced approach and have unbiased taxation by using a flat tax. that way you can calculate the amount of taxes we need for the deficit over 10 years. another point is to control the spending on entitlements by not giving millionaires social security benefits, thereby satisfying president obama's approac
. patricia rights in -- i want to go to don on the republican line from california. good morning. caller: canyon me? merry christmas, happy here -- happy new year. that last call shows you that the policy to win by dividing the country and making it us against them, the 47%, they are angry, they want your money, it is amazing. indeed to pass an exemption, all government trouble is not to be paid for with the tax exemption. amend the code says that anybody traveling for government purposes pays for themselves. that is obama and the $40 million worth of vacations. it is amazing. you heard the caller from georgia a comic that they are angry and they will write. you can see the country is being run by an amateur who does not know how to negotiate, he cannot write something on paper. anybody in college in 101 knows that you need to negotiate in a fair minded way. he is out to ruin the country. listen to his agenda. host: do you think compromise can be reached in the next 48 hours? caller: the answer is no. they want the retina. they are getting the money from the people -- they want the reven
carefully considered? >> they were carefully considered, and there were really several options. don't act because the evidence isn't strong enough and the risks are too high. we can go through that. have a standoff attack. work jointly with the pakistanis on a operation. or have a unilateral raid. at the end of the day the reason i think that the president did the unilateral raid, the reasons were several fold. number one, it allowed certainty. that there wouldn't be a debate after the operation as to whether or not, in fact, osama bin laden had really been taken out. we would have proof, and we just wouldn't have bought the united states a propaganda war around this. second, it also allowed us to limit the potential for casualties of noncombatants and we discovered, obviously, during the course of the raid that there were close to two dozen noncombatants at the compound. three, it allowed us to limit casualties with respect to people around the compound, completely innocent. and the president had a lot of confidence in that option for this reason. although it was 50/50, let's say, there
more true of consumers, citizens, is a little vague and perhaps over inclusive but today i don't have to worry about that because today we are talking about a public of readers and those are old readers and young readers and sophisticated readers and casual readers, incisive readers, wine readers, all readers together. to begin, what do all these readers like about printed books? as i was trying to think of themes here, i went to elizabeth eisenstein's book divine art, internal machine, the response to print in the west, a sense of demanding, now out in paperback. she suggests two answers to the question what do readers like about the book, drawing of course from the history of the early reception of print. one answer is readers from the very beginning, from the fifteenth century forward have responded very positively to the fixity of the book, the apparent stability that printed pages bound between stiff material gives to texts. she writes printing came to be known as the divine art partly because it was regarded as the art which preserved all other arts. but somewhat paradoxically a
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